1. Balaji's Antiquities and Collectibles:

By ART4YOU EDITORIAL | Issue 01 | SEPT 2020

SECRET JEWEL OF BANGALORE

Woiden Gilded Kinnara , South India

PHOTO @JESSICA JOSEPH

VINTAGE MID CENTURY RADIOS & SEWING MACHINE

PHOTO CREDIT@JESSICA JOSEPH

REMINGTON TYPEWRITER 1970

PHOTO CREDIT@JESSICA JOSEPH

AIR INDIA PROMOTIONAL MERCHANDISE 1960/1970

PHOTO CREDIT @JESSICA JOSEPH

GILDED BRACKETS WHICH RECLAIMED FROM DAMAGED ALTER FROM CHETTINAD

PHOTO CREDIT @JESSICA JOSEPH

Rolling down the lane, one of the Chickpet neighborhood 's oldest streets in Bangalore feels like a classic Indian scene stereotyped in so many movies — people, traffic, animals, and a nice dose of color and noise mixed with each other. A flight of stairs is an oasis of peace in a by-lane off this street-the quaint supermarket, Balaji's Antiques & Collectibles. Collectibles, furniture and art pieces from various ages light for room on the many racks, walls and floor. For a shop specializing in antique products, the environment is hardly  overwhelming. Instead, the place and owner Balaji, welcome you to discover and enjoy the joys of discovering something  beautiful and storied.Balaji's Antiques wasn't always a luxury goods shop. It originated as a  shop selling what is today one of the antiques icons-gramophones. 

More than 35 years ago, when Mr Veerendra Heggade,the Dharmasthala temple administrator, decided to establish a museum for the devotees of the temple, it was Balaji 's father who entrusted him with the task of collecting artefacts. Over the years, Balaji and his father provided the museum with items ranging from ships, vehicles, and aircraft to antiques.Balaji,in his search for antique objects, remembers the many fascinating expeditions his father embarked on. "My dad bought a whole antique train from Kolkata in early 90's," says Balaji. "He spent three months  in the train every night before it was delivered to the museum, to deep the pieces from being  stolen!

 

D.G. BALAJI - OWNER

2. PRIMITIVISM & AFRICAN SCULPTURES

By Ajay Vasudevan | Issue 01 | SEPT 2020

The spontaneity of intuitive, ethnic art imported from Africa and other styles, which were erroneously and derogatively described as “primitive” and “barbaric”, began to be recognised as possessing great emotive power.

African sculptures are famous amongst collectors around the world, and offer tremendous insights into the cultures and tribal communities from where they originate. Often figurative, they typically depict the human form. Usually fashioned out of wood, they may have religious or spiritual references. This sculpture of a man, carved using indigenous African wood, has intricately carved details and striking features. The collectible is most likely from the 1970s, and its origin can be traced back to either Cameroon in Central Africa or Mali in Western Africa.

LEFT : AFRICAN SCULPTURE /CENTRE: STANDING POSE/ RIGHT :EBONY WALL HANGING / PHOTO CREDIT @AJAY VASUDEVAN